Boeing’s 737 Officially Loses Title Of World’s Most Popular Jet To Airbus A320

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Boeing’s 737 Officially Loses Title Of World’s Most Popular Jet To Airbus A320

The competition with Airbus that led to Boeing cutting corners on the 737 Max to begin has now cost the jet its title as the world’s most popular plane.

The Airbus A320 has now officially seized the title of the world’s best selling narrow-body airliner, overtaking Boeing’s 737 and 737 Max models, according to RT. Boeing’s 737 was once the best selling commercial aircraft of all time, but that domination is now slipping away. 

The Airbus A320 had attracted a total of 15,193 orders while the similar class 737 has 15,136 orders on its books as of October. 

Boeing is still ahead when it comes to deliveries, but that gap is closing quickly also. In October, Airbus shipped 77 aircraft to customers, 59 of which were A320s, while Boeing had only delivered 20 planes. 

Boeing's 737 Officially Loses Title Of World's Most Popular Jet To Airbus A320

Airbus is slowly fulfilling the mission put forth for the A320 project when it was developed nearly 3 decades ago: challenge the 737 in the narrow-body jet market and become the aircraft of choice for many airlines in Europe and beyond. Airbus now says that one A320 family jet takes off or lands somewhere in the world every 1.6 seconds. 

Both jets are similar in nature, despite the Boeing plane being slightly more spacious:

“Both A320 and 737 feature the six-abreast seating, but from a passenger’s point of view, the American jet is slightly more spacious as its cabin is 15cm wider. Airbus catches up by increasing the jet’s fuel-efficiency, reducing the noise footprint or cutting operational costs.”

And things look like they could still be getting worse, before they get better, for Boeing.

Boeing’s newest jet, the 737 Max has been grounded across the world after two fatal crashes that killed 346 people. The crashes have been blamed on carelessness and overlooking features of the plane’s MCAS systems.

Additionally, yesterday, the NTSB recommended additional retrofits and changes to the 737 as the result of its investigation into last year’s deadly engine blast on a Southwest flight. 

 


Tyler Durden

Wed, 11/20/2019 – 19:25